Archive of iMac Rumors

Following their shipment earlier this week, the first orders of Apple's redesigned 27-inch iMac have now begun arriving at their destinations, with several MacRumors readers reporting that they have receiving their shipments today ahead of their projected December 13 delivery dates.


Apple announced the redesigned iMac at its media event on October 23, but noted that the 21.5-inch model would not begin shipping until November with the 27-inch models following in December. Apple began taking orders for both sizes on November 30, with the 27-inch models seeing 2-3 week shipping estimates at that time.

Availability remains tight as Apple reportedly works to achieve acceptable yields of the new display assembly, which laminates the display directly to the cover glass. With the larger 27-inch displays proving more difficult to assemble than their smaller siblings, supplies of the 27-inch iMac models are particularly tight.
As noted by a number of MacRumors forum members, customers who placed early orders for the new 27-inch iMac are beginning to see their credit cards charged and order statuses changing to "Preparing for Shipment". The new status indicates that the orders can no longer be changed or canceled and is the final stage before the machines are passed off to delivery companies.


Customers who have received updated order statuses are reporting that they are still seeing their originally quoted delivery times, which are typically in the range of December 21-31, but it seems that their orders may arrive slightly ahead of that window if they ship out in a timely fashion.

So far it appears that only U.S. customers have reported seeing their orders being prepared for shipment, but there are still only a few data points available. A number of those seeing their orders being readied for delivery have also included built-to-order configurations, indicating that custom orders will be arriving essentially alongside stock models.

Update: Apple has now begun shipping these early orders, with many customers seeing delivery dates of December 18 while a few are seeing dates as early as December 13. We're also hearing from customers outside of the United States that their orders are similarly progressing toward shipment.
Shipping estimates for Apple's new 27-inch iMac models have been updated today to "January", marking the first time availability of the machines has been pushed back into 2013. Orders had previously been estimated at 3-4 weeks for shipping.


The new "January" estimate may or may not represent a lengthening of lead times given that the previous 3-4 week window was already pushing into January, but at the very least it seems that Apple is introducing some uncertainty into future availability by simply stating a one-month window for new orders rather than measuring estimates in weeks.

Supplies of the new iMac have been tight since the machine's launch one week ago, and were already expected to be constrained into 2013. The bottleneck for Apple is said to be the new production process on the machine's display, which is laminated directly to the cover glass. The process is more troublesome for larger screens, making supplies of the 27-inch iMac more scarce than those for its 21.5-inch sibling.
There are multiple reports that some of the new 21.5-inch iMacs are shipping with an "Assembled in USA" label.

Fortune is reporting that one of their readers walked into a San Jose, California Apple Store and purchased an off-the-shelf iMac that was assembled in the United States. During their teardown, iFixIt also found that their iMac was assembled in the USA, as shown in the photo below.


Fortune acknowledges that this has been noticed online as far back as 2006, though mostly for build-to-order Macs
As it turns out, this is not the first time the assembled-in-USA question has come up. There are several threads on the topic in the Apple support site dating back to 2006. The consensus seems to be that only units made to order -- say, with an extra-high-capacity hard drive -- get their final assembly in the States.
There's a suggestion that the non build-to-order U.S. assemblies are a new phenomenon, but the distinction is far from clear.

Back in 2010, members in the MacRumors forums had reported that they were also receiving new iMacs being labeled as "Assembled in USA", though their exact configurations weren't discussed.
With Apple's new iMac going on sale today, the first reviews of the new machine are starting to arrive. The reviews come alongside some early teardown photos and benchmarks offering an early glimpse at Apple's redesigned flagship desktop.

CNET has a thorough review of the 27-inch model, which won't be shipping to customers for several more weeks, noting that while the design is the major change to the machine, iterative improvements on already impressive performance-related specs keep the iMac in solid position.
You might be alarmed by the fact that the design is the most interesting thing about the new iMac. A thin bezel is nice to look at, but it doesn't improve processing speed, workflow, or overall utility. Fortunately for Apple, it evolved that design from a computer with a strong technical foundation. It is the updates to that foundation, and a few points of polish along the way, that keep this iMac on elite footing.

CNET's review machine, a souped-up $2599 model with 3.4 GHz Core i7 processor, 1 TB Fusion Drive, and NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680MX graphics, performed quite well in benchmark tests and features Apple's new display lamination process that greatly reduces reflectivity. The new iMac compares relatively favorably to Dell's XPS One 27 in many respects, with the Dell's touch capabilities and Blu-ray drive perhaps being significant factors in its favor for some users.

The Verge has also reviewed both sizes of the new iMac and was similarly impressed by the new display process being used by Apple.
The IPS panels are the same as in last year’s iMacs, but they’re better integrated now — Apple says that by laminating the display to the glass it reduced reflections up to 70 percent, and indeed the glare problems that beset so many displays are much less present here, though there's still some reflection and glare. The improved manufacturing also makes whatever’s on the screen feel closer to you, almost like things are jumping out of the panel. The display's glossy bezel, which houses its HD FaceTime camera, is actually the most reflective part of the whole machine now.

I have to say, I was really surprised to see how much better the screen could be without a single change to the actual technology — but hey, I guess plastic surgery can work wonders. Both screens have fantastic color reproduction, are remarkably (like, blindingly) bright, and have near-180-degree viewing angles.
Overall, The Verge gives both iMac models scores of 9.0, noting that it is "still the best all-in-one device out there" but suggesting that the door is open for Windows 8 machines integrating advanced features like touchscreens and media center software to compete strongly with the iMac.
Just hours after Apple began taking orders for the new iMac, shipping estimates in the company's online store for the stock 27-inch models have slipped from the original 2-3 weeks to 3-4 weeks. Estimates for the stock 21.5-inch models remain at 1-3 days.


Supplies of the new iMac are expected to be constrained into 2013 as Apple's suppliers deal with the challenges of producing thinner displays laminated directly to the cover glass, with the larger 27-inch panels being particularly difficult to produce.
Primate Labs today posted a summary of the new iMac benchmarks hitting the company's Geekbench Browser, showing fairly strong performance increases over the previous generation of machines. The analysis focuses on the 21.5-inch models, as the 27-inch models are not launching for several more weeks, and the latest high-end 21.5-inch model scores nearly 25% higher than its 2011 counterpart and even bests the high-end 27-inch model from last year by nearly 10%.


The report also pits the new 21.5-inch iMac against the current generations of Apple's other two desktop lines, the Mac mini and Mac Pro. The comparison to the Mac mini reveals that users can achieve nearly the same performance as the mid-range iMac by purchasing a high-end Mac mini, although customers would obviously have to supply their own displays and other peripherals.
What's interesting here, though, is how the quad-core Core i5 iMacs perform compared to the quad-core Core i7 Mac minis. Since Core i7 has hyper-threading technology (and the Core i5 does not), it can execute more instructions at once, leading to higher performance.

Here this means that the mid-range Mac mini is faster than the mid-range iMac that's almost twice the price. True, you do get a display and a discrete GPU with the iMac, but these Geekbench results show how powerful the new Mac mini is despite its size.
As for the Mac Pro, which is still stuck on older-generation processors rather than adopting Intel's Sandy Bridge E chips, the new iMac is now on par with all but the high-end 12-core Mac Pro models.

As for the new 27-inch iMac, a handful of Geekbench results have already appeared in the database running a special Build 12C2037 of OS X 10.8.2. The results indicate that an early benchmark that appeared in mid-May was indeed accurate and indicate that the new high-end 27-inch model will outperform its 2011 counterpart by nearly 15%.

Apple is now accepting orders for the new iMac on their online store. The new iMacs offer dramatically reduced thickness and add a brand new Fusion Drive that combines flash storage and a traditional disk-based hard drive to maximize both speed and capacity.

The 21.5" model starts at $1299 and $1499 while the 27" model starts at $1799 and $1999. The 21.5" model is shipping in "1-3 business days" while the 27" model ships in 2-3 weeks. Limited stock of 21.5" iMacs should also be available in Apple retail stores starting today. The previously reported iMac build-to-order options were accurate with a variety of RAM, Processor, Hard Drive and Graphics Card upgrades available for specific models.

We previously posted an unboxing video of the new iMac.
The new iMac is going on sale around the world on Friday, November 30th. In Australia, Ben Pasternak was able to walk into his local Apple Store and buy one and has posted the first unboxing video of the new machine:


Meanwhile, Japanese site Kodawarisan has posted teardown photos showing the innards of the thin new machine.


The new iMac tapers to a 5mm thin edge along the sides, requiring the use of a special welding technique to achieve the design.

The 21.5" iMac will go on sale today in the U.S. both in retail stores and in the online Apple store with immediate availability. The 27-inch model will be available for pre-order but won't ship until December. Stock is expected to be tight throughout 2012.
DigiTimes reports that shipments of both the iPad mini and iMac are expected to be constrained throughout 2012. In both cases, display production appears to be the limiting factor.

For the iPad mini, the panels have reportedly seen low yield rates, especially from one of Apple's suppliers. As a result, Apple may only reach 6 million of an estimated 10 million target for iPad mini shipments in the fourth quarter of 2012.

Meanwhile, the newly announced iMacs will also see constrained supplies due to issues with iMac panels from LGD.
Additionally, the sources said new iMac models use panels sourced only from LGD. The company has had to develop a new production process for mass producing the iMac panels and has limited capacity, which is delaying shipments.
Yields of both products aren't expected to reach target goals until the first quarter of 2013.

Apple just announced that the new iMac would go on sale on Friday, November 30th, but the 27" model wouldn't start shipping until December.
Following Apple's announcement today that the new iMac models will go on sale this Friday, November 30 with immediate availability of 21.5-inch models and December availability of 27-inch models, Apple reseller Expercom has posted full configuration and pricing information for each of the models. While Apple has detailed the available customization options since last month, the company had not previously listed pricing information for the various options.

- Base 21.5-inch model: Only one internal customization is available on the $1299 base model, with a $200 charge to upgrade RAM from 8 GB to 16 GB. The RAM is not officially user-upgradable, so those interested in 16 GB of RAM may be interested in considering this option.

- High-end 21.5-inch model: In addition to the same RAM upgrade option available on the low-end model, the high-end model starting at $1499 also offers options for a processor bump from 2.9 GHz Core i5 to 3.1 GHz Core i7 ($200) and to upgrade the base 1 TB hard drive to a Fusion Drive ($250) that incorporates solid-state storage for faster performance.


- Base 27-inch model: The $1799 base model includes a 2.9 GHz Core i5 processor and NVIDIA GeForce GT 660M graphics, with a number of RAM upgrade options ranging up to $600 for 32 GB of Apple-installed RAM, although Expercom offers its own RAM options for considerably lower pricing and users can upgrade the RAM on the 27-inch models at a later date. A number of storage options are also available, with the base 1 TB hard drive upgradeable to 3 TB for $150. Each of those hard drives can also be upgraded to Fusion Drives for an additional $250 premium, and Apple also offers a 768 GB all-flash drive as a $1300 upgrade.

- High-end 27-inch model: The $1999 model bumps the default processor to a 3.2 GHz Core i5 and the graphics to NVIDIA GeForce GTX 675MX with 1 GB of GDDR5, which can be upgraded to a 3.4 GHz Core i7 ($200) and NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680MX with 2 GB of GDDR5 ($150). Storage and RAM upgrades are the same as on the base 27-inch model.
Apple today announced that the new iMac will go on sale this Friday, November 30. The 21.5-inch model will see immediate availability through multiple distribution channels, while the 27-inch model will begin shipping in December.
The 21.5-inch iMac will be available through the Apple Online Store (www.apple.com), Apple’s retail stores and select Apple Authorized Resellers. The 27-inch iMac will be available for order through the Apple Online Store and will begin shipping in December.

Apple resellers have been quoting receipt of shipments over the next few days, but official sales will not begin until Friday. Apple unveiled the redesigned iMac at its October 23 media event, announcing that the 21.5-inch models would ship in November with the 27-inch models following in December.